OxGAPS symposium offered an open space for debate on important issues.

Participants of the first panel of the Symposium (from l to r) Brian Whitaker (partly hidden), Dr Hafez Khan, Dr Nada Dhaif (Bahrain), Maryam al Rayes (Iraq) Ghassan Khaddim (iraq) and Ghaith al Amaireh (Jordan).

Participants of the first panel of the Symposium (from l to r) Brian Whitaker (partly hidden), Dr Hafez Khan, Dr Nada Dhaif (Bahrain), Maryam al Rayes (Iraq) Ghassan Khaddim (iraq) and Ghaith al Amaireh (Jordan).

Many participants in the symposium held in Oxford on 16 November have commented on the importance of the event and how it contributed to providing an open space for debate on many important issues affecting the Middle East Region at this moment. The Symposium with the theme “Old and new challenges for the Arab countries of the Middle East and the Gulf” was held at Oxford University, and organised jointly by the Oxford Gulf and Arabian Peninsula Studies Forum (OxGAPS) and the John Smith Memorial Trust.

Around one hundred academics and students from Oxford University and other UK education institutions and practitioners from many Arab countries, participated in the one day event. They included participants from Iraq, Bahrain, Oman, Jordan and Lebanon who were in the UK attending the John Smith Fellowship Program for the Middle East and North Africa – a fellowship program held twice a year with the support of the “Arab Partnership Initiative” of the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

You can read a summary of the proceedings at the symposium here

There were three panels during the symposium with participants coming from Oxford University and other UK institutions, as well as from countries in the Gulf and the Levant.

Maimuna Al Suleimanli (Oman), Dennis Sammut (OxGAPS), Melkar al Khoury (Lebanon) and Dr Mona Hejres (Bahrain) during the second panel of the symposium.

Maimuna Al Suleimanli (Oman), Dennis Sammut (OxGAPS), Melkar al Khoury (Lebanon) and Dr Mona Hejres (Bahrain) during the second panel of the symposium.

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This entry was posted in Archive, GCC Countries, Gender, Government and Politics, History, Iraq, Religion, Social Issues and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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